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November 16, 2021

Annie Helms, Gabriella Licata, and Rachel Weiher's article "Influence of orthography in production and perception of /b/ in US Spanish" has been accepted for publication at the Journal of Experimental Phonetics. Congratulations!

A paper by Miriam R. L. Petruck (PhD 1986) and co-authors Ayush Pancholy and Swabha Swayamdipta, entitled "Sister Help: Data Augmentation for Frame-Semantic Role Labeling," has just been published in Proceedings of the Joint 15th Linguistic Annotation Workshop (LAW) and 3rd Designing Meaning Representations (DMR) Workshop. Congrats!

November 15, 2021

TABLE: Toward a Better Linguistics Environment, a colloquium series taking place this fall, concludes on Monday, November 22, with a presentation by Anna Bax (CSU Long Beach), held via Zoom and in person in Dwinelle 370 (hybrid) from 3-4:30pm. Those who would like to attend, including Berkeley linguists, need to register for the event regardless of mode of attendance (Zoom registration; in-person registration). The presentation is entitled "Teaching linguistics for social transformation," and the abstract is as follows:

In this presentation, I show how linguistics pedagogy can function as a “liberatory practice” (bell hooks) and pathway toward social transformation, especially for students who are themselves linguistically minoritized. I begin by outlining some lessons learned from my initial pedagogical training in sociolinguistic justice during my 5 years spent teaching in UC Santa Barbara’s SKILLS (School Kids Investigating Language in Life and Society) program, including the limits of an individualistic "error-correction"/"mythbusting" approach to linguistics education. We will then discuss an undergraduate Language and Social Justice course that I taught for the first time in Fall 2020, at a moment when students (and I) were reeling from multiple overlapping social crises. I recount the decision-making process behind my choice to redesign the course around the linguistic aspects of these ongoing crises: language access and healthcare for d/Deaf communities and users of minoritized spoken languages during COVID; the linguistic components of police brutality against Black and Indigenous communities, d/Deaf and Hard of Hearing people, and non-English speakers; and the roles of media discourse and metaphor theory in the rise of far-right populism, among others. By bringing linguistics scholarship into conversation with topics not typically discussed in a linguistics classroom, such as transformative justice and abolitionism, mutual aid, and direct action, the course is structured to guide students away from despair towards activism and social change. I conclude by laying out several necessary considerations for those interested in incorporating a social justice approach in their own linguistics pedagogy, including ways to weave these issues throughout the linguistics curriculum.

Please join us on Monday, November 29, for Qualifying Paper (QP) project presentations by graduate students in linguistics! The event will take place in Dwinelle 370.

QP Fest | November 29, 2021 | 3:10-4:50pm

3:10-3:22 | Alexander Elias | FETAS: A novel methodology for visualizing dialect chains and linkages
3:22-3:34 | Aurora Martinez Kane | Gender, status, and solidarity: social perceptions of Traditional New Mexican Spanish across communities
3:34-3:46 | Dakota Robinson | Indexing authenticity within and between speech communities: Variation in Breton rhotics
3:46-3:58 | Zachary Wellstood | Sluicing licensed by head-based identity in Aklanon

3:58-4:03 | Break

4:03-4:14 | Allegra Robertson | Gradient vowel weight in Yanesha': Contrast and mora preservation
4:14-4:26 | Wendy Liz Arbey Lopez Marquez | Internally and Externally Headed Relative Clauses in Nuntajɨɨyi
4:26-4:38 | Phuong Khuu | The third type of definites in Vietnamese
4:38-4:50 | Anna Bjorklund | Typology of word prosody in Patwin

November 14, 2021

Here's the latest from the California Language Archive:

  • Hannah Sande, with the assistance of Julianne Kapner, has archived a new collection of materials related to Nobiin (Nile-Nubian; Egypt, Sudan), stemming from the Georgetown field methods course she taught in the spring of 2018. The collection consists of sound recordings of elicitation sessions and texts, with accompanying transcriptions, glossing, and translations of sessions. Hannah has also added 32 file bundles of sound recordings of elicitation sessions and texts to her collection related to Guébie (Kru; Côte d'Ivoire) from fieldwork in 2015, 2016, and 2017 (see 049-080). More is forthcoming!

November 12, 2021

In and around the linguistics department in the next week:

November 9, 2021

Gašper Beguš's paper "Identity-Based Patterns in Deep Convolutional Networks: Generative Adversarial Phonology and Reduplication" has just been published in Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics (TACL). It is available as an Open Access download here.

The paper was also presented at EMNLP 2021. The talk is recorded here.

Congrats, Gašper!

Peter Jenks is an invited speaker at the 2021 Western Conference on Linguistics (WECOL) at Fresno State, taking place this weekend (November 13-14). His plenary talk is called "Rethinking the distinction between argument and wh-movement: Evidence from Tira." The conference is on Zoom and all are welcome to attend. The program is available here.

Congrats, Peter!

November 8, 2021

TABLE: Toward a Better Linguistics Environment, a colloquium series taking place this fall, continues on Monday, November 15, with a presentation by Linda Tuhiwai Smith (Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi), held via Zoom and in person in Dwinelle 370 (hybrid) from 3-4:30pm. The presentation is entitled "Decolonizing Linguistics." Those who would like to attend, including Berkeley linguists, need to register for the event regardless of mode of attendance (Zoom registration; in-person registration).

November 7, 2021

Here's the latest from the California Language Archive:

  • Hannah Sande, with the assistance of Julianne Kapner, has archived a new collection of materials related to Gã (Kwa; Ghana), from the Georgetown field methods course she taught in the fall of 2019. The collection consists of sound recordings of elicitation sessions, with accompanying transcriptions, glossing, and translation of sessions.
  • We hosted a visit by Mischelle Dressler, Lisa Enos, Herman Fillmore, and Mitchell Osorio, who consulted William Jacobsen's (PhD 1964) lexical file slips of Washo (isolate; CA). The visit was sponsored by the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival.

November 5, 2021

In and around the linguistics department in the next week:

November 2, 2021

TABLE: Toward a Better Linguistics Environment, a colloquium series taking place this fall, continues on Monday, November 8, with a presentation by Julie A. Hochgesang (Gallaudet), held via Zoom and in person in Dwinelle 370 (hybrid) from 3-4:30pm. Those who would like to attend, including Berkeley linguists, need to register for the event regardless of mode of attendance (Zoom registration; in-person registration). The presentation is entitled "Documenting the signed language use of the American Sign Language (ASL) communities as a Deaf linguist," and the abstract is as follows:

In this presentation I present my journey as a deaf linguist in North America and how experiences along the way have influenced my current theoretical preferences and practices in the work I do. These include having to push down feelings of rejection each time I read a generalist work on linguistics and finding no mention of signed language (especially when they are discussing “all human languages”); working on a dictionary project with Kenyan Sign Language users and considering how to make it theirs; thinking about how to textually represent a signed language that, like many others, have not been conventionally written down; and navigating how to document language use in today’s apocarevolutiondemic world in a project I’ve named from the ASL signs “document” “covid” - “O5S5”. Along the way, I muse on what it means to be inclusive and how tricky this is (e.g., for us “there’s no one way to be deaf”). And how important it is for our field and communities we work with to recognize and respect what should be a wide range of work reflecting what kind of lives are actually being lived and being meaningfully done by people living these lives.

November 1, 2021

Here's the latest from the California Language Archive:

  • We remodeled our research room! Thanks go to Erik Maier, Edwin Ko, and Allegra Robertson for assisting. The remodel moves our collection of reference books out of the archive room, making available space for cabinets and shelving for new archival materials. Come by and check it out!
  • We are hosting a weeklong research visit by Dr. Darla Garey-Sage, who is working with William Jacobsen's (PhD 1964) numerous Washo (isolate; CA) lexical file slips.
  • We hosted a tour of the CLA for a group organized by Sharon Inkelas, Professor of Linguistics and Associate Vice Provost for the Faculty, including: Khira Griscavage, Associate Chancellor and Chief of Staff to the Chancellor; Martha Chavez, Associate Chief of Staff to the Chancellor; Christine Treadway, Assistant Chancellor for Government and Community Relations; Linda Rugg, Professor of Swedish Literature and Associate Vice Chancellor for Research; Phenocia Bauerle, Director, Native American Student Development; Peter Nelson, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management and Ethnic Studies; and Carolyn Smith, Postdoctoral Scholar, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.
  • Thanks to Emily Remirez, who alerted us to a drawer of analogue recordings in 51 Dwinelle: 50 reel-to-reel tapes, 19 cassettes, 15 VHS tapes, six U-matic tapes, and one 45! The recordings generally stem from work done in the PhonLab. Represented are 23 languages, in addition to unidentified Siberian languages: Arabic, Ashaninka (Arawak; Peru), Dutch, French, Guatemalan Sign Language, Hindi, Hmong, Hungarian, Ikalanga (Bantu; Botswana, Zimbabwe), Kalabari (Ijoid; Nigeria), Korean, Mandarin, Mazahua (Oto-Pamean; Mexico), Mixtec (Mixtecan; Mexico), Northern Pomo (Pomoan; CA), Nyamwezi (Bantu; Tanzania), Polish, Quechua, Quiotepec Chinantec (Chinantecan; Mexico), Tamil, Thai, Xhosa (Bantu; South Africa, Zimbabwe), and Yucatec Maya (Mayan; Mexico). Most are "speech sound" recordings, described in accompanying paper documentation as "designed primarily to provide the user practice recognizing and transcribing some of the important sound contrasts" in these languages. Others come from, for example, Leanne Hinton's courses on Chalcatongo de Hidalgo Mixtec in 1981 and 1982 (with Nicolás Cortés), and from Michelle Caisse (PhD 1988) and Catherine O'Connor's (PhD 1987) early documentation of Northern Pomo, including unique recordings of stories told by Edna Guerrero.

October 29, 2021

In and around the linguistics department in the next week:

October 27, 2021

Zsuzsanna Fagyal (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), who gave an online seminar in the French Department last year, will give an in-person lecture entitled "Stylistic innovations in language as 'place-making' among the multiethnic working-class urban youth in Paris" from 5-6:30 on November 2, 2021 in the French Department Library (4229 Dwinelle). Click here for the flyer with an abstract.

October 25, 2021

Congratulations to Amy Rose Deal and Charles B. Chang (PhD 2010), who received the Early Career Award from the Linguistic Society of America!

October 24, 2021

Here's the latest from the California Language Archive:

October 22, 2021

In and around the linguistics department in the next week:

October 21, 2021

Zachary O'Hagan was a contributor on Thursday to KQED Forum's segment "How Preserving Indigenous Languages Revitalizes California Culture, Identity and History" (listen here!), together with Phil Albers (Karuk), Quirina Geary (Mutsun, Tamien), and Jennifer Malone (Wukchumni). This month he also published an academic obituary for Gerald Weiss (1932-2021), an early ethnographer in Ashaninka communities of the Tambo River region of Peru.

October 20, 2021

Congratulations to the following Berkeley linguists, who have contributed to Proceedings of the 38th West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics (WCCFL):